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10 things we don't see in Bollywood anymore

Last updated on: June 10, 2010 18:45 IST

10 things we don't see in Bollywood anymore

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Preeti Arora in Mumbai

Most Bollywood films today are scripted as per a genre. We have thrillers, love stories, murder mysteries and kiddie flicks just to name a few.

But for many years through the '50s and '60s, our films were all encompassing. We had action, emotion, melodrama and romance all rolled into one.

As the pot broilers disappeared from the single screens, many other symbols and props have practically disappeared from our movies. Here's taking a look at the few things we hardly ever see at the movies these days...

The Pomeranian dog

Only two kinds of dogs were seen on screen those days -- German Shepherds and Pomeranians. While the German Shepherds are still there guarding factories and chasing terrorists, the Pomeranian has all but disappeared.

The Pomeranian was a much-coveted English breed which automatically endowed the owner with a certain status. Remember Om Shivpuri the industrialist in Namak Halal, barking orders on the telephone, cuddling a white snappy dog, or Zeenat Aman in Laawaris?


Image: A scene from Laawaris

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The Matka

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For today's heroines the much cherished accessory is the Prada or Hermes bag.

But the sari-clad demure damsels of those days happily lugged the matka all over the village. Sometimes it was made of clay or brass.

But invariably they encountered the hero or the villain while returning from the well and the course of their lives was altered forever.


Image: A scene from Abhimaan

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The black telephone

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Cell phones of course were unheard of and even the humble cordless had yet to make an appearance. More often than not these were black in colour.

If a jazzy piece was required they were rented out from well-known property hirers. These ornate pieces were available in different colours and the dial was generally made of brass.

The same phone was used in different films for at least a decade or more.


Image: A scene from Hera Pheri

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The triple-breasted suit

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Like the Pomeranian, this particular piece of clothing was also a sign of affluence. The wearer of this suit was a person of status and wielded considerable clout.

Invariably there was a gold chain affixed to the buttons. And a cigar wedged in the right hand.

The triple breasted suits were edged out in the early '80s. And with constantly changing regulations producers prefer avoiding any references to cigars or cigarettes these days.


Image: A scene from Don

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The Tonga

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Today we see the tonga as a vehicle for a joyride in the hit film Jaane Tu Ya Jaane Na.

But those days it was the standard means of transportation. Many a song has been picturised in this humble vehicle where the hero is separating from the heroine.

The most popular number which comes to mind is Musafir Hoon Yaron from Gulzar's hit film Parichay.


Image: A scene from Parichay

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The butterfly sitting on a flower

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The hero is busy romancing the heroine in a park. He pulls her close, swoops down towards her lips and we cut to the butterfly sitting on a flower. Or a bee sucking nectar...

When we return to the couple they have a smug self-satisfied expression on their faces. The audience may have felt cheated, but censors were happy and most films were passed without any cuts.


Image: A scene from Manchali

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Sindhoor

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This was not just a part of the heroine's make-up. It was the foundation on which a woman built her whole life. News of a husband's death was often conveyed by the box of sindhoor being snatched out of a woman's hand.

This little box of red powder obviously had a tremendous emotional connect with the audience. When Shashi Kapoor grabs the sindhoor from his mother's hand in Deewar the audience wept copiously...


Image: .

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Harmonium

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This simple instrument was extensively used in most hit songs those days. But it was equally popular on-screen. Urchins begged in trains with the harmonium around their necks. 

Ek Chatur Naar from Padosan had Kishore Kumar wielding the harmonium. Even Amitabh Bachchan in Khai Ke Paan Banaraswala (Don) managed to dance with the harmonium in tow.

These days, music is composed on synthesizers and harmoniums have been relegated to Chor Bazaar.


Image: A scene from Padosan

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Feathers and sequins

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These days skin is in. But the famous vamps of yesteryears were catering to family audiences. So revealing costumes were adorned with feathers and sequined tassels.

It kept the censors in a good mood. The sequins are still around in subtler avatars but feathers haven't been spotted in a long time. But this trend may just see a comeback soon.

Apparently Aishwarya Rai's Endhiran due for release towards the end of this year has an overload of feathers in some of her costumes.


Image: A scene from Ek Shriman Shrimati

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Roller skates

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These have been used on many an occasion. And no not by kids!

In fact the 1973 classic film Aa Gale Lag Jaa had Shashi Kapoor and Sharmila Tagore fall in love during a skating competition.

Seeta Aur Geeta had Sanjeev Kumar and Hema Malini enact an entire song on roller skates. Of course it was their doubles who did all the hard work.


Image: A scene from Patthar Ke Phool

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